Posts Tagged ‘GTG’

Rants by Ryan Horky: “Self-Titled” by Edible Intention

Edible Intention: S/T
(Good Time Gang records/Silver Maple Kill records)

Ryan Horky comes back to LMTV with a review of Edible Intentions’ posthumous self-titled release. Check it out!

This is a posthumous release from a Lansing, MI band that was active from roughly 2007-2010. Once they got outta the practice space they were basically the house band for the Lansing art-space/all-ages show collective Basement 414. If you lived in Lansing at the time and were remotely plugged into the local punk scene you probably saw these guys a thousand times. I’m not sure they ever got outta town. They played a pretty intense mix of free-jazz informed Stooges wail and Minutemen anything-goes stomp. This album was recorded near the tail end of when they were active and sat on the shelf for a while until the all-around good folks at Good Time Gang Records decided to release it (and Lansing label Silver Maple Kill records pressing it up). I was pretty curious to hear this. As much fun as an Edible Intention show was, they could turn into a hot mess of noise pretty quickly. (Not an insult, by the way….) I wasn’t sure their sound could be translated to disc. Producer Tommy McCord did a great job of making them palatable without sacrificing the noise quotient. The vocals are definitely an acquired taste (and they’re mixed suitably low) but I dig ‘em anyhow. Even if you can’t take the caterwaulin’, the guitars are pretty raunchy in a Melvins/Nuggets kinda way and the songs are short and varied enough to hold your attention. The cover artwork totally reminds me of an early 90′s SST release. (You know, it looks sort of awesomely terrible.) I don’t think this CD would necessarily have the same impact on anybody who wasn’t around to catch ‘em in their prime, but it’s still well worth checking out if you’re into more adventurous (but still way rockin’) sounds.-

Drinking Mercury “Orcades” review

Drinking Mercury, by far the oldest Good Time Gang records-affiliated project at over 10 years old, has finally put out their first full length entitled Orcades. Here’s a review.

Opener “Grateful Day” has reverberated drums pulsating and guitars that sound like they’re planets away as swathing guitar fuzz dominates the left channel. “Barely Strung”, the following track, features loud (but not too overbearing) guitars and Michael Boyes’ distinct warbly falsetto. He even belts out some screams toward the end. “Pretend” has a Sonic Youth feel to it. Vocalist and guitarist Tommy McCord takes the lead vocal here. He doesn’t sound all that inspired and the track just feels a bit lackluster. I’ve heard a lot of the tones that they’re putting to tape on this track.

“Saydene” is by far the album’s standout track. I love the main guitar line here. It’s the audio equivalent of a Wild West duel. A swagger, sincerity and brittle toughness envelope the track via Boyes’ vocal and the excellent and dissonant walking bassline via Timmy Rodriguez. “Hey, Hey Sally” is also a great track. As I noted in my review of Drinking Mercury’s “Words” EP, I love Boyes’ vocal here. The version found on Orcades a re-recorded version which has a more “live” feel to it and Boyes’ vocal is more intense and dynamic.

Check this out for yourself here.

 

 

Honah Lee Q and A by Claire Lea

This Q and A, by local writer Claire Lea with Honnah Lee, comes a few months after the band released their newest album, “Life Won’t Let Me”, on Good Time Gang Records.

The lights arise and the band starts playing the crowd erupts in cheers that sounds as if they had been old friends when really this music belongs to the growingly popular Trenton New Jersey band Honah Lee.
With a new CD released in collaboration with Good Time Gang records, they are turning heads and gaining more recognition for there upbeat, slightly bitter lyrics.
Honah Lee has been a band since 2008 however the individual band members have held a residency since long before then. Tim Hoh lead singer of Honah Lee along with Anthony Catanese drummer (also known as Tony or Goggles) have been in many bands together since 1998. The pair had been in the band Philo before forming Honah Lee. while touring with the band they had met and became great friends with Lansing locals The Plurals, in which they had stayed in touch with for many years.
Also while in Philo they had obtained bass player Jim who they found while playing with his band Moscow girls. Jim stayed with the guys through the change of name, new lead guitarist Dim, and a revamped sound. What the name Honah Lee had meant to the guys hadn’t been clear. However, when looking up the definition of it, urban dictionary had given a very helpful explanation of what Honah Lee meant and it seemed to explain the band very well in a few mythical words: “The land that is home to Puff the Magic Dragon”.

How was the name created?

Tim Hoh: we had our first show booked as the new band but still had no name after two months. one day ant showed me a paper plate that he had wrote HONAH LEE on and I immediately loved it!! but I was the only one, and when it got down to the wire and we needed something to put on the flier I convinced everyone to be on board with the name.

Anthony: Beer

So you guys have been to Lansing a few times.. how are your feelings on our great city?

Anthony: If it has a vagina or, and this a big or, had a shaved a-hole…. I’d bang it

Tim Hoh: We consider it our home away from home!!! by far the most welcoming city we travel to!!!

Dim: I have been in Lansing about two or three times now with Honah Lee. Every time is awesome almost as if it were a homecoming hosted by some of the friendliest, most appreciative, and independent- minded folks Iv’e ever had the distinct pleasure of knowing.

Where would you like to go with the band?

Anthony: The bar.

Tim Hoh: Everywhere.

Dim: I would like to take over the world if that’s possible!

How do you feel about the new album compared to other ones?

Tim Hoh: I think this album is the best thing I’ve ever been a part of, I feel that for the first time someone managed to capture Honah lee on record, for the first time our live energy shows on a record.

A few last notes from some of the guys:

Jim: I let these guys answer the questions, and they did a great job, so I’m going to treat you with a haiku:

Honah Lee’s in town!
Shit, god damn! They fuckin rock!!
Better recognize.

Anthony: p.s. I’m not on five hits of acid right now.

Honah Lee “Life Won’t Let Me” Review

The newest addition to the Good Time Gang roster, Honah Lee, are back from the swamps of New Jersey with a new album, entitled “Life Won’t Let Me” (Good Time Gang Recordings). Having put out a split with The Plurals last year, do they go in the same epic and catchy direction or somewhere else entirely? Here’s a review.

This is pretty mid-tempo, catchy and overall good power chord driven punk. The guitars, as on “Bobby’s Dead” and “Leave It to my Goddamn Brain” are sharp and concise. Power chords are their best friends. Played by vocalists/guitarists Tim Hoh and “Dim”, they drive the melodies and add extra an extra kick. The occasional guitar solo is Ramones-esque where it stays within the songs key and melodic range without being too outlandish (they would do Johnny Ramone proud). The bass is punchy and sometimes fuzzed out. It helps enhance the rhythm from just a typical punk rhythm to something else…probably something like if Martin Hannett tweaked a few knobs here and there during production. The bass plays it’s part but also has its own space.

I really like the vocals and the lyrics on this album. Singer Hoh has a hookiness in his raspy voice that’s undeniable. Songs get stuck in your head with nicely placed melodies and “oh ho ho” vocables that make the record such a return listen. The lyrics are great here too. Lots of singing about beer, parties and mid-20s life. On “Bobby’s Dead”, Hoh sings “Gimme something with a badass tempo, gimme something that’ll stick in my head/Gimme something with some real emotion/Gimme something so I know I’m not dead”. This coupled with the “nah-na-na-nah” choruses are great party anthems. I can only imagine a room full of sweaty punks screaming along. This song will be a great live crowd pleaser.

If you’re looking for something that’s mostly uptempo, catchy and a great overall listen, I recommend this. Go pick it up.

Josh David and the Dream Jeans “Can You Believe We Landed On the Moon?” review

So, it’s been a little while since the album release for Josh David and the Dream Jeans‘ full length, “Can You Believe We Landed On the Moon?”. Here’s a review of said album.

The immediate difference between Josh David and the Dream Jeans and every other Lansing band that I’ve encountered is their front man, Josh David. When he performs with the band live, he goes wild, strangling himself with the mic and running around in his underwear. This live presence translates well to the record. David screams at the top of his lungs (and surprisingly) has the occasional bit of melody seeping out, like on “Tall Paul Rides Again”.

I really enjoy the lyrics on this album. They’re quirky yet meaningful. “Aware of the Riverman”, about fellow Lansing-via-Seattle friend and musician, Johnny Unicorn, mentions Unicorn by name. “His name’s John Benjamin Adams but you can call him Johnny Unicorn” David scowls. It’s really great that David is paying tribute to such a great friend in song. “Capitol City 2-Step” is about David’s hometown of Lansing, MI and the pride he has for the city and the mitten state. “Lansing Michigan’s where I call home” he screams.

Guitars here are noisy, dissonant. Blasts of noise and feedback occur frequently as well as power chords that chug throughout the album. Guitarist Nich Richard shreds with little regard for the well being of the instrument (or his own well being for that matter). The occasional solo happens but they’re kicked out fast. The bass, played by Michael Boyes, is audible and usually follows the guitar lines. Boyes reaches toward the top of the neck occasionally, adding a bit of dissonance on the low end too. The drums (played by Christian Urabazzo) are tight and fast. Usually following the hardcore 1-2 snare downbeat, they keep things moving.

My only complaint is with the length of the album. 14 songs at (mostly) under two minutes, with little changing musically throughout the album, can make it hard to sit through. My favorite tracks are “Capitol City 2-step” and “Aware of the Riverman”. I encourage full listen straight through to see what sticks with you but, in my mind, only a few tracks stand out. That’s not to say that all of the other songs are sub-par. It’s just that 14 tracks on a punk rock record is a lot to sit through.

If there’s an album that makes you think of old school Michigan punk (like The Meatmen or The Crucifucks), it might be this record. Regardless of what it makes you think of, check this out here.

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